Working To Enhance The Quality Of Life
In Baltimore And In Maryland.

Abell Award in Urban Policy: Submission Guideline

I. GENERAL INFORMATION:

The Abell Award in Urban Policy is given annually to the student who authors the most compelling paper on a policy problem facing the City of Baltimore and feasible solutions. The Selection Committee decides on the allocation of the $5,000 award. The award is sponsored by the Baltimore-based Abell Foundation and the Johns Hopkins Institute for Health and Social Policy. The contest is intended to encourage fresh thinking about the challenges facing Baltimore City.

Please note that the Abell Award requires papers that address a timely issue, provide careful analysis, propose a feasible solution, and are written in a straight forward academic style. It is unlikely that a term paper will meet these requirements without substantial additional research and revision to the narrative style.

II. ELIGIBILITY:

Applicants must be full-time, matriculated students at the schools listed below at the time of the final paper deadline: February 15th, 2018.  If a team (no more than two students) is submitting a paper, both individuals on the team must be full-time students as of this deadline.

Eligible colleges and universities are:

  • Coppin State University
  • Goucher College
  • Johns Hopkins University
  • Loyola University Maryland
  • McDaniel College
  • Morgan State University
  • College of Notre Dame in Maryland
  • Towson University
  • University of Baltimore
  • University of Maryland, Baltimore
  • UMBC
  • University of Maryland, College Park
  • Stevenson University 

III. SUBMISSION REQUIREMENTS:

To facilitate the review and selection process, all entries must adhere to the following requirements; papers that do not will not be reviewed.

A. Entry Form: Deadline October 19th, 2017

Entry forms must be emailed to abellaward@jhu.edu no later than 4:00p.m. Thursday, October 19, 2017. The Entry Forms will be reviewed for completeness and suitability. Prior to submitting the Entry Form, it is suggested that you review Winning Papers from prior years.  If the entry form meets the competition guidelines, the submitter will be invited to submit a full abstract of the proposed paper. Submitters with topics that are far afield of the focus of the competition will not be invited to submit an abstract.

B. Abstract Deadline: November 17th, 2017

Your abstract submission must include the name of submitters, your institution, degree program, and phone and email contact information.

Guidelines:

  • Abstracts should be emailed to abellaward@jhu.edu no later than 4:00p.m. Friday, November 17th, 2017.
  • Abstracts must be no longer than 250 words and must address the following questions:
  1. What issue will your paper address? (~ 1 sentence)
  2. Why is it important to Baltimore? (~ 1-2 sentences)
  3. What is your research approach? (~ 4-5 sentences)
  4. What policy area(s) and specific policies will your findings address? (~ 1-2 sentences, listing is acceptable)
  5. Can you complete the proposed research by the due day of the paper? 

Submission of a well thought out abstract is a critical step.  If your abstract does not adequately answer these questions, you will not be invited to submit a final paper. Please avoid jargon and highly technical language. We strongly recommend that you use the attached format, and limit your submission to 1 page please.

Sample abstract:

1. What issue will your paper address? (~ 1 sentence)

My paper will address the issue of arrests made by police that do not result in charges, the policies that encourage high numbers of "quality of life” arrests, and the validity of the theories, such as ''broken windows,'' driving these policies.

2. Why is it important to Baltimore? (~ 1-2 sentences)

Baltimore police arrest about 1,800 people each month who are held in the central booking facility for hours or days before being released without charges. The ACLU estimates that over 50% of warrantless arrests in Baltimore result in no charges being filed, or charges being dismissed. The resulting economic, psychological, and physical harm to citizens and their families caught up in these arrests and the substantial cost to taxpayers who underwrite these arrests may offset any public safety benefits.

3. What is your research approach? (~ 4-5 sentences)

My primary research approach will be to review literature and data on the subject of quality of life arrests and the broken windows and other relevant theories. I will augment this research with arrest data from Baltimore City, and compare this with other cities that have adopted different approaches to policing including community policing.

4. What policy area(s) and specific policies will your findings address? (~ 1-2 sentences or simply list the relevant topic areas)

  • Crime
  • Policing
  • Arrests

5. Can you complete the proposed research by the due day of the paper?

Given the data availability and my research schedule, I am confident that I am able to complete my research within the contest timeframe. 

C.  Paper Submission Deadline: February 15th, 2018

Paper must be received by 4:00 p.m. Thursday, February 15th, 2018 and adhere to the formatting detailed below. PLEASE NOTE: You must submit SEVEN (7) HARD COPIES of your final paper PLUS an electronic copy emailed to abellaward@jhu.edu.

These copies must be delivered in one of three ways:

Hand delivered

Standard mail

Express mail

Institute for Health and Social Policy (IHSP)

Sandra J. Newman, Ph. D.

Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health

Department of Health Policy and Management /IHSP

624 N. Broadway, #349

Baltimore, MD 21205

Abell Award in Urban Policy

ATTN:

Sandra J. Newman, Ph. D.

Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health

Department of Health Policy and Management/ IHSP

624 N. Broadway, #349

Baltimore, MD 21205

Institute for Health and Social Policy (IHSP)

Sandra J. Newman, Ph. D.

Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health

Department of Health Policy and Management/IHSP

624 N. Broadway, #349

Baltimore, MD 21205

If you choose to mail your seven papers, you must ensure sufficient time for delivery. Your papers must be received by 4:00 p.m. Thursday, February 15th, 2018 NOT postmarked by this time.

(1) LENGTH & FORMAT:

  1. Maximum of 25 double-spaced pages
  2. Times New Roman, 12-point font
  3. One-inch margins (horizontal and vertical)
  4. Paginated
  5. Indent paragraphs five (5) spaces
  6. Numerical (Arabic) endnotes should be used for citations to references
  7. Superscript letters should be used for explanatory footnotes
  8. The body of the paper should contain no identifying information about the author
  9. Numbers from 0-9 should be written out as words (e.g., nine), and numbers of 10 or greater should be shown as numbers (e.g., 12)
  10. Leave two spaces after a period at the end of each sentence
  11. If you include charts (e.g., table, graph), please insert them as soon after the paragraph or page when first mentioned (and every chart must be referenced in the text)
  12.  Headings should follow this format:

Flush Left Margin, Bold and First Letter Cap

Main heading

     Indent Five, Bold, and First Letter Cap

Second-level heading

     Indent Five, Bold, First Letter Cap and Start text directly after period in the same line

Third-level heading

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

We discourage more than three levels of headings.  If you find it necessary to exceed three, email Abell Award at abellaward@jhu.edu

DO NOT USE:

  1. Colored graphics (the judges receive black and white copies). Make sure the graphics are clear and distinct.
  2. Borders or any decorative formatting.

(2) COVER PAGE:

Because this is a blind review, you should include two cover pages:

  1. One stating the title of the paper and the identifying information for the author or two co-authors (name, school & department, year in school and degree your are pursuing, address, phone number and email address); and
  2. One stating only the paper’s title, with no identifying information on the author(s).

(3) EXECUTIVE SUMMARY:

Each paper must include an Executive Summary of no more than 500 words that briefly states:

  1. The problems studies
  2. Key arguments/evidence for its importance
  3. The most important conclusions emerging from the analysis, and
  4. The main policy recommendations

(4) CONTENTS:

Every paper must:

  1. Clearly describe the problems and its significance. Be sure to establish a direct link between your definition of the problem and how you proposed solution(s) will address them.
  2. Present a thorough and careful analysis of empirical and other evidence.
  3. Propose specific policies, programs, or other action steps to redress the issue. If discussing an approach that has already been implemented, you must provide an assessment or evaluation of it. (NOTE: Be sure to devote sufficient attention in your paper to policy recommendations. Roughly 20 percent of the paper should focus on what should be done about the problem.)
  4. Present an analysis of the problem that is directly connected to your policy recommendations. 
  5. While your analysis must be carefully and systematically conducted and described, do not devote more time (and space) to the analysis section than necessary. Remember: the section of the paper dedicated to the policy recommendation(s) and feasibility must constitute a significant portion of the paper.
  6. If your recommendation is the extension of an existing program initiative, your paper should provide evidence of its effectiveness.  Any existing initiatives should be identified and any evaluation of these programs should be shared.
  7. Your paper must include a Literature Review that covers the full scope of research addressing your topic including key studies providing evidence on all sides of the issue. Be sure to include a brief discussion of the rigor of studies reviewed and place greater emphasis on the most rigorous studies.
  8. Use of charts, such as tables, graphs, and maps, can be helpful in making arguments more vividly.
  9. Avoid jargon and highly technical language. If unavoidable, definitions may be included in an appendices, which will not count against the 25 page limit.
  10. Proofread the paper multiple times. It is recommended that you have someone other than yourself do final proofreading before you hand in the paper. Papers that contain numerous typos will be viewed unfavorably.

A reminder: Please do not include any identifying information in the body of the paper.

(5) QUANTITY:

Please submit seven (7) hard copies and one (1) electronic copy of your paper.

(6) FORMATTING:

Here is the link to formatting guidelines

Example of citation format 

IV. DISCLOSURE OF RELATED ONGOING RESEARCH

We strongly encourage submissions by Ph.D. candidates who wish to submit portions of their dissertation or articles they are preparing for completion of the degree.  If this paper emanates from a larger research project conducted under one or more faculty PIs and funded by a grant or contract, be alert to the following eligibility criteria:

  • Your Abell paper’s research must be original.
  • The paper must be solely authored by the submitter.
  • Your focus, its conceptualization, data analysis, policy implications, and all of the writing must be the work of the submitter and not the faculty members or other members of the research project.

In addition, you must fully disclose the auspices under which you have conducted this research and clearly explain the independence of your work from the larger faculty research project.  It is helpful if you include a letter from the faculty member who is the PI of the larger project, verifying the independence of your work.

V. SELECTION PROCESS:

The winning papers are selected through a “blind” review by a panel of judges comprised of Baltimore policymakers, opinion leaders and practitioners, and IHSP faculty. Papers will be judged based on the following criteria: importance of issue, quality of analysis, quality of writing, and feasibility of solution. The judges reserve the right not to make an award if none of the contest entries meet the criteria.

Winning entries will be circulated (after revision and with the author’s permission) to relevant city and state policymakers and posted on the IHSP and Abell Foundation websites.

VI. DEADLINES:

Entry form deadline: 4:00 p.m., October 19th, 2017

Abstract deadline: 4:00 p.m., November 17th, 2017

Final paper deadline: 4:00 p.m., February 15th, 2018

Submit your seven (7) hard copies to:

Hand delivered

Standard mail

Express mail

Institute for Health and Social Policy (IHSP)

Sandra J. Newman, Ph. D.

Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health

Department of Health Policy and Management/IHSP

624 N. Broadway, #349

Baltimore, MD 21205

Abell Award in Urban Policy

ATTN:

Sandra J. Newman, Ph. D.

Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health

Department of Health Policy and Management/ IHSP

624 N. Broadway, #349

Baltimore, MD 21205

Institute for Health and Social Policy (IHSP)

Sandra J. Newman, Ph. D.

Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health

Department of Health Policy and Management/IHSP

624 N. Broadway, #349

Baltimore, MD 21205

VII. QUESTIONS:

If you are uncertain about the suitability of your topic, you may email abellaward@jhu.edu with your concerns. You are also strongly encouraged to visit the FAQ page for additional information. We also suggest that students consult with their academic advisors for substantive guidance.

VIII. CONTACT:

The Johns Hopkins Institute for Health and Social Policy manages this competition. All inquiries and questions should be sent via email to abellaward@jhu.edu. Please do not contact the Abell Foundation for additional information.